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Tracking the Moon Observations Log

A.

Date & Time

B.

Location

C.

Sky Conditions

D.

Moon’s Azimuth & Altitude

Azimuth: _______o

Altitude: _______o

E.

Drawing

F.

Moon Rising or Setting

G.

Phase & other Information

? Rising (towards the east)

? Overhead–at the Meridian

? Setting (towards the west)

Phase closest to: _____________

? Crescent ? Gibbous

? Waxing ? Waning

A.

Date & Time

B.

Location

C.

Sky Conditions

D.

Moon’s Azimuth & Altitude

Azimuth: _______o

Altitude: _______o

E.

Drawing

F.

Moon Rising or Setting

G.

Phase & other Information

? Rising (towards the east)

? Overhead–at the Meridian

? Setting (towards the west)

Phase closest to: _____________

? Crescent ? Gibbous

? Waxing ? Waning

B. Location(s):
Write the number from below in Cell B:

1: ________________________________ 2. ________________________________

Tracking the Moon Observations Log

A.

Date & Time

B.

Location

C.

Sky Conditions

D.

Moon’s Azimuth & Altitude

Azimuth: _______o

Altitude: _______o

E.

Drawing

F.

Moon Rising or Setting

G.

Phase & other Information

? Rising (towards the east)

? Overhead–at the Meridian

? Setting (towards the west)

Phase closest to: _____________

? Crescent ? Gibbous

? Waxing ? Waning

A.

Date & Time

B.

Location

C.

Sky Conditions

D.

Moon’s Azimuth & Altitude

Azimuth: _______o

Altitude: _______o

E.

Drawing

F.

Moon Rising or Setting

G.

Phase & other Information

? Rising (towards the east)

? Overhead–at the Meridian

? Setting (towards the west)

Phase closest to: _____________

? Crescent ? Gibbous

? Waxing ? Waning

B. Location(s):
Write the number from below in Cell B:

1: ________________________________ 2. ________________________________

Tracking the Moon Observations Log

A.

Date & Time

B.

Location

C.

Sky Conditions

D.

Moon’s Azimuth & Altitude

Azimuth: _______o

Altitude: _______o

E.

Drawing

F.

Moon Rising or Setting

G.

Phase & other Information

? Rising (towards the east)

? Overhead–at the Meridian

? Setting (towards the west)

Phase closest to: _____________

? Crescent ? Gibbous

? Waxing ? Waning

A.

Date & Time

B.

Location

C.

Sky Conditions

D.

Moon’s Azimuth & Altitude

Azimuth: _______o

Altitude: _______o

E.

Drawing

F.

Moon Rising or Setting

G.

Phase & other Information

? Rising (towards the east)

? Overhead–at the Meridian

? Setting (towards the west)

Phase closest to: _____________

? Crescent ? Gibbous

? Waxing ? Waning

B. Location(s):
Write the number from below in Cell B:

1: ________________________________ 2. ________________________________

THE ASTROLABE – MAKING A SIMPLE ALTITUDE-FINDING DEVICE

The ASTROLABE was invented in Greece by either Hipparchus, a 2nd Century BC astronomer, or Apollonius of Perga, a 3rd Century BC mathematician. For many centuries, it was used by both astronomers and navigators, and especially by the 15th century AD explorers who used it to determine latitude, longitude, and time of day.

Supplies required:

· File folder or protractor cut-out copied on card stock

· Drinking Straw

· Dark string or strong thread

· Washer

· Glue (to glue protractor cut-out to file folder)

· Transparent tape

· Scissors

· Hole punch (optional)

Directions:

1. Print out a copy of the protractor, on the following page.

2. Glue the copy of the protractor to file folder. Cut the protractor out with scissors.

3. Using scissors or a hole-punch, carefully make a small notch at each of the lines marked along the curved edge of the cardboard-mounted protractor. These notches will come in handy when you’re measuring the angle between two celestial objects and you have to hold the device horizontally.

4. Cut a drinking straw to the same length as the sides of the device as indicated.

5. Tape the drinking straw to the edge of the device marked “attach straw to this edge.” Be careful to not tape the straw on the astrolabe, but just on the edge.

6. Carefully poke a small hole through the device where the “!” is marked, pass the string through it, and knot the string at the back of the cardboard or tape it there.

7. Tie the washer to the opposite (front) end of the string as shown.

The finished altitude-finder, called an Astrolabe

PROTRACTOR CUT-OUT FOR THE ASTROLABE

Small Hole “??” Carefully poke a small hole at this point. Be careful not to oversize the hole or ‘poke’

NOTE: Print this on card stock, or glue to a file folder and then cut out the protractor.

Phases of the Moon

New Moon – The Moon’s unilluminated side is facing the Earth. The Moon is
not visible except during a solar eclipse.

Waxing Crescent – The Moon appears to be partly but less than one-half
illuminated by direct sunlight. The fraction of the Moon’s disk that is illuminated
is increasing.

First Quarter – One-half of the Moon appears to be illuminated by direct
sunlight. The fraction of the Moon’s disk that is illuminated is increasing.

Waxing Gibbous – The Moon appears to be more than one-half but not fully
illuminated by direct sunlight. The fraction of the Moon’s disk that is illuminated
is increasing.

Full Moon – The Moon’s illuminated side is facing the Earth. The Moon
appears to be completely illuminated by direct sunlight.

Waning Gibbous – The Moon appears to be more than one-half but not fully
illuminated by direct sunlight. The fraction of the Moon’s disk that is illuminated
is decreasing.

Last Quarter – One-half of the Moon appears to be illuminated by direct
sunlight. The fraction of the Moon’s disk that is illuminated is decreasing.

Waning Crescent – The Moon appears to be partly but less than one-half
illuminated by direct sunlight. The fraction of the Moon’s disk that is illuminated
is decreasing.

Example